Many couples in Nebraska deciding to divorce have a concern first and foremost for their children. Trying to support the kids while going through a difficult time personally, it is easy for many parents to believe that they would be best suited to have the children, but new studies show that children who have shared custody between both parents come out on top.

Although it is not possible in cases of violence or abuse, the Boston Herald reports that a new study has found that joint custody produces the best outcomes for children whenever it is safe. The study looked into more than 40 previously published studies looking at the effects of divorce conflict on children. It found that although traditionally judges are working to put children through the least amount of conflict, the relationship with their parents matters more than any other factor in a divorce. Children who were able to maintain close bonds with both parents fared best. The research found that although 80 percent of mothers are still awarded primary custody, policies should focus on strengthening a child’s bond with both parents, “rather than assuming that joint physical custody is not an option.”

Similarly, a Swedish study reported by Science Daily has found that young children in joint custody arrangements have fewer issues. The study had parents and teachers of more than 3,600 preschool children fill in a survey accounting for any psychological or behavior problems they found in a child. Children who were raised both primarily or entirely by one parent had more issues reported by both the parents and teachers.